Claremont, California Pizza Restaurants

How to make a Great Restaurant Quality Pizza

When it comes to making restaurant pizza at home, it is often difficult. This is due to the type of pizza oven that might be available to you. In spite of the numerous challenges, you can still give the local pizza joint in your area some run for their money. This article will run briefly through the essential cooking best practices for making a restaurant pizza at home.

We will be using the famous New York Neapolitan type pizza style. It will be doughy, with chewy crust rolled thin and great sauce with lots of dark spots from top to bottom.

  1. The Crust

When it comes to getting the type of crust you find in the restaurant pizza, you have to understand the dough hydration and the rise time. The dough will require more water so it can be crispier on the outside and chewier on the inside. To get more flavor out of your flour, you have to allow the dough to rise slowly as the yeast goes into it moving through the sugar. Once this is done, we move to the all-important sauce.

  1. Sauce

The best pizza sauce to be used in making a restaurant sized pizza is good quality uncooked canned tomatoes. you don’t have to bother with cooking the tomatoes – a colander and a blender will do. This is probably the reason why you have been getting it wrong all this while. Probably the only reason why your pizza doesn’t taste right like the joint’s down the street. Stop cooking your pizza sauce. It will ruin the sauce.

  1. Shaping the dough

This is a crucial stage in the pizza creation process. In order to avoid a pizza dough that will take up a fight with you, don’t use a rolling pin on the dough. This is quite critical. The dough already contains gluten and this influences the structure of the dough. The key is to resist from shaping it with a heavy hand as it will fight back and prevent you from shaping it as you wish. You get the dough wet and shaggy so it’s easy to work with. refrain from adding too much flour while shaping it so the crust is light and doughy and not tough. Occasionally, you can wet the flour and your hands so the dough won’t spring back while you work on it. The key to getting a chewy pizza crust is to hydrate often.

  1. Toppings

Topping your pizza is next. Ensure you do this on a peel dusted with cornmeal. If you don’t have access to a pizza peel, you can use the underside of a baking sheet dusted with cornmeal. Use minimal sauce here, especially the drained tomatoes.

Using too much will make the pizza wet and soggy. For the cheese, use a lower moisture mozzarella and not a succulent one as that would make the pizza soggy.  You can buy at the grocery store or just grate your own to prevent the cornstarch the pre-grated ones come with. This often affects how well the cheese melt. When using the toppings, balance, and restraint should be your watchword. Don’t smother the dough with too much and don’t go over the top with too many toppings as well.

Once this is done, you have to cook the pizza in the oven. Make it as hot as 500 degrees Fahrenheit, minimum. Watch the pizza while it cooks, it should only take 4 to 5 minutes and then when it’s done, sit down to enjoy your homemade restaurant pizza.